829 search results for "Banned Books Week"

Case Study: League of Extraordinary Gentlemen: The Black Dossier

The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen: Black Dossier, written by Alan Moore and illustrated by Kevin O’Neill, is a sort of meta “sourcebook” for the popular series of the same title. Rife with literary and popular culture mashups, the book follows…

Case Study: Fun Home

Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic is a graphic novel memoir of the author’s childhood, particularly focused on her relationship with her closeted gay father Bruce. As Alison grows older and realizes that she is a lesbian, she and…

Case Study: Bone

Although considered a modern comics classic that’s delighted millions of readers all over the world, Jeff Smith’s Bone is also one of the most commonly challenged books in American libraries. Bone tells of three creatures known as the Bones, who…

Case Study: Blankets

In 2006, Craig Thompson’s celebrated graphic novel, Blankets, was challenged in the Marshall, Missouri Public Library. Blankets is the semiautobiographical story of Thompson’s upbringing in a religious family, his first love, and how he came to terms with his religious…

History of Comics Censorship, Part 1

Below is a web-friendly version of the CBLDF presentation on the history of comics censorship, which has been delivered to audiences of scholars, lawyers, advocates and readers in the United States. Please contact CBLDF about bringing this presentation to your…

Remembering Ray Bradbury: Author, Dreamer, and Champion of Free Speech

In losing Ray Bradbury, we lost not only a great author and spirit, but a man dedicated to the preservation of creative expression. In remembering Bradbury’s contribution to speculative fiction, CBLDF blogger Joe Sergi takes a moment to talk about the time he met Bradbury at SDCC and to share the anti-censorship legacy Bradbury left behind.

Click through for Sergi’s remembrance of Bradbury…

“In Our Mothers’ House” Restricted Access in Utah School District

With the President’s recent open approval of same-sex marriage; a federal appeals court striking down the Defense of Marriage Act (claiming it unconstitutional); the success of Life with Archie #16, featuring the marriage of a gay character; and Marvel and DC’s inclusion of prominent storylines about gay characters, one may surmise it is easy for everyone to access constitutionally-protected LGBT materials. This is not the case, as students in a school district north of Salt Lake City will have to get parental permission before checking out a book about a lesbian couple raising a family, according to a recent article on the Huffington Post.

Click through for excerpts from the article and a look at protests against other LGBT content by CBLDF blogger Justin Brown.

CBLDF’s History of Comics Censorship Presentation, Annotated by Joe Sergi’s Cup of Geek

PictureJoe Sergi, blogger for Cup of Geek went to the CBLDF presentation The History (And Future) of Comics Censorship at C2E2 last weekend and wrote an extensive recap of the panel, with additional research and annotations by the author. CBLDF is pleased to represent Sergi’s post in full as a resource for our members and supporters. Read Sergi’s post after the jump.

Intrepid Alaska Third Grader Overcomes Classroom Comics Ban

Chris Wilson with The Graphic Classroom, a website dedicated to “promoting the use of high-quality comic literature in the elementary, middle school, and high school classroom,” shared a story over the weekend about a third grader in Alaska who used his science fair project to overcome his teacher’s ban on comics in the classroom.

Click through for more about third-grader Sam and the science fair project that opened a teacher’s mind to comics…